Social Isolation and Loneliness Among Seniors

As we grow older, our ability to maintain the kinds of social contacts we had grown accustomed to naturally contracts. Senior Americans become less mobile, particularly driving, lose friends, children move and socializing can become too taxing to those with declining health. Consequently, older adults can become socially isolated and are prone to developing chronic loneliness. Even couples, with one suffering significant health issues and/or disabled from engaging in meaningful companionship, are prone to becoming lonely.

Download Article

Motivating Seniors to Embrace Exercise

The benefits of exercise among seniors in late life can be significant. There is consensus among private and public health organizations that physiological benefits can be achieved even by frail elders and the oldest of the population.

Download Article

“Observation Status”

An ongoing challenge for the elderly is the handling of their visits to a hospital emergency room. Many seniors visit an emergency department (ED) and, despite hours or in some cases days of monitoring and treatments received in what appears to be an inpatient bed, they come to learn that they were never admitted inpatient, but rather, were placed on “observation status,” pending a decision to admit, which never materialized.

Download Article